Intel announces Aero Ready To Fly Drone with onboard RealSense cameras

Intel announces Aero Ready To Fly Drone with onboard RealSense cameras

Intel’s drone platform combines compute, storage, communications and flexible I/O in a form factor the size of a standard playing card
At IDF 2016, Intel has announced a new platform for unmanned aerial vehicles powered by Atom quad-core processor. The platform combines compute, storage, communications and flexible I/O in a form factor the size of a standard playing card.
Intel says matching the platform with an optional vision accessory kit, developers can launch sophisticated drone applications. Intel also showcased a new Aero Ready to Fly drone, a fully-assembled quadcopter with compute board and an integrated depth and vision sensing thanks to onboard Intel RealSense cameras. The Aero Ready To Fly Drone also supports several plug and play options, including a flight controller with Dronecode PX4 software. Intel’s Aero compute board is now available for $399 while the Aero Ready To Fly Drone will be available by the end of this year.
Intel also showcased the award-winning Yuneec Typhoon H drone with Intel RealSense Technology at IDF 2016. Yuneec Typhoon H was first showcased at Consumer Electronics Show 2016. The drone is one of the first to feature RealSense cameras, which allows the drone to intelligently avoid obstacles. With Intel RealSense cameras, the intelligent drone from Typhoon also decides its alternative course around obstacles. The Typhoon H is priced at $1,899.
Drones are the next big thing in the world of technology. From shooting videos to remote monitoring, drones are being deployed extensively around different areas. With RealSense cameras, Intel is aiming to make drones intelligent – letting them think about their course of action on their own.
Read: Intel Joule is a high performance platform for Internet of Things
While drones are turning popular across different userbase, they are also criticised for being not aware of the environment around them. This particular solution from Intel could fix this in the near future.

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